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Our Curriculum    

Our students encounter the riches and complexities of Judaism through an analysis of the primary texts of our tradition.  The focus of the curriculum is on teaching meaningful and relevant topics and themes in Judaism with practical moral or philosophical lessons via rigorous text study. 

Freshmen study the foundations of Jewish ethics.  Using Tanach, Talmud, and commentaries throughout the ages, the students explore the very meaning of life by examining provocative topics such as abortion and euthanasia. 

Sophomores tackle what it means to live in a diverse global society.  They study the development of Rabbinic Judaism inside the Talmud itself (in addition to a wide variety of other primary Jewish texts) and confront the challenges of successfully living in the 21st century. 

Our juniors travel to Israel, and by examining primary historical documents, they explore their roots via a course of study of Jewish history with an emphasis on the complexities of life in modern Israel. 

As our seniors begin to get ready for college and beyond, they consider topics relevant to what they are going to encounter on campus, such as Israel advocacy and the Jewish views of money management.  Students also take our Spiritual Tefilah Curriculum in which they explore the meanings behind Jewish prayer. 
 
We also offer a wide array of Judaic Studies electives.  The goal of our elective program is to empower our students to take control of their Jewish education.  Sample course offerings include Modern Israel and Israel Advocacy, Women in Judaism, Judaism and the Arts, Musical Midrash, Advanced Judaic Studies, Senior Project, G-d and Evil, The Shoah (Holocaust), What Happens After You Die, Biblical Criticism, and Comparative Religion.

Our students also take part in the Neta Hebrew language curriculum that aims to fully immerse our students in the vitality of the Hebrew language with an emphasis on becoming fluent Hebrew speakers and readers.  Modern Hebrew is taught as a living language.  Students learn to be conversational, thinking in Hebrew, not merely translating, acquiring a love of Hebrew literature and poetry.  We currently offer five levels of instruction. 

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